AnnualSecurityReport

27 2022 ANNUAL SECURITY & ANNUAL FIRE SAFETY REPORT of the appeal, including notification of whether the appeal changes the initial outcome of the original decision-maker or requires additional process. Both parties will also be notified simultaneously in writing when the results of the process become final. Records Requests Upon request, the University will disclose the results of any disciplinary proceeding conducted by the University against a student who is the alleged perpetrator of any crime of violence or a non-forcible sex offense, to the alleged victim or the alleged victim’s next of kin, if the victim is deceased. Confidential Reporting Options Students who would prefer to discuss incidents of sexual harassment (including dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking), sexual exploitation, or any other form of sexual harassment or sexual misconduct to a confidential resource may contact the following on campus resources: University Counseling & Psychological Services Johnson Hall, 4th Floor 610-758-3880 The Chaplain’s Office The Dialogue Center 661 Taylor Street 610-758-3877 Faculty and staff who would prefer to discuss incidents of sexual harassment (including dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking), sexual exploitation, or any other form of sexual harassment or sexual misconduct to a confidential resource may contact the following resource: Uprise Health Employee Assistance Program 1-800-395-1616 Programs to Prevent Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking Lehigh’s Prevention Programs include Primary Prevention Programs, Primary Awareness Programs, and Ongoing Prevention and Awareness Campaigns. Primary Prevention Programs: The University implements programming, initiatives, and strategies, informed by research or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome, that are intended to prevent incidents of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking through the promotion of positive and healthy behaviors that foster healthy, mutually respectful relationships and sexuality, encourage safe bystander intervention, and seek to change behavior and social norms in healthy and safe directions. Each year, the Title IX Coordinator and the Director of the Office of Gender Violence Education & Support assess relevant data to determine strategies and programming to promote healthy relationships and prevent incidents of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking. Primary Awareness Programs: The University implements comprehensive, intentional, and integrated community-wide or audience-specific programming, initiatives, and strategies that increase audience knowledge and share information and resources to prevent sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, promote safety, and reduce the perpetration of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking. Ongoing Prevention and Awareness Campaigns: Lehigh implements programming, initiatives, and strategies for students and employees that are sustained over time and focus on increasing understanding of topics relevant to, and skills for, addressing sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking using a range of strategies with audiences throughout the University. Many of these programs and campaigns are described in the “Gender Violence Education & Support” section of this Report. Some of the programs and campaigns are also highlighted below. During orientation programs for incoming students (including transfers and graduate students) and for new employees, students and employees are reminded that the University prohibits dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, sexual exploitation, and any other form of sexual harassment or sexual misconduct. The University’s policies and procedures, along with appropriate resources, are also discussed. The orientation programs for students also address consent, healthy relationships, bystander intervention and risk reduction, as well as the application of these concepts to their new college environment. For example, students discuss sex communication in the context of consent (providing verbal or non-verbal affirmative consent), as well as in the context of healthy relationships (considering your communication style in relationships). The Bringing in the

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